Borg Trucker Jacket | 14.11.17

Martha Jane Edwards wearing a baker boy hat, borg trucker jacket, white high neck knit, black skinny jeans and buckled black ankle boots with a black tote bag | marthajaneedwards.com


BORG TRUCKER JACKET


This week, I’ve been thinking an awful lot about the act of unfollowing. It’s a topic that I ponder fairly regularly, and one that countless people have written about before me. Most people seem to come to the conclusion that it’s almost always the best thing to unfollow anybody who makes your time spent on social media less enjoyable, and for all intents and purposes, I hold that opinion, too. However, social media politics make me feel incredibly reluctant to hit that unfollow button for fear of rocking the boat. Instead, I find myself scrolling through my feed becoming increasingly disinterested, frustrated or even depressed.
 
Like most people, when I first signed up to Twitter, Instagram, Tumblr and the like, I followed people who I was interested in following. My social media feeds were filled with content that inspired and encouraged me, and I enjoyed the time I spent on them. However, the longer you exist online, the more complicated this whole following business becomes. For example, you meet somebody at an event and come home to discover they’ve followed you. It would seem rude not to follow back, even if you’re not interested in what they post, so you click the button. Multiply that situation by 10 and suddenly, your feed is full of unwanted and unwelcome sentiments, and over a year later, you don’t have the heart to unfollow. It’s even worse when it’s somebody who you’ve followed due to their unwavering support of everything you do.
 
I hear you say: why not mute them? Well, it’s complicated. I’m a relentlessly honest person (which isn’t always a good thing) and I value honesty above almost everything else, so something about muting instead of unfollowing feels wrong to me. Of course, there are exceptions to this rule – muting certain words which have the potential to be used abusively or ruin the end of your favourite movie, for example, seems to be perfectly acceptable to me. After all, social media is the only space where we might find ourselves subject to a stream of opinions from people we don’t know or care to know. However, muting somebody you follow is just another example of how social media has distorted and dehumanised the way we interact with each other. If somebody is saying something you don’t like in real life, you don’t have the option to silence them in secret. Instead, you stop talking to that person either temporarily or permanently, so why don’t we do that online?
 
Unfollowing somebody is very rarely a personal thing. For example, I recently unfollowed somebody on Twitter because the content they retweeted was beginning to make me feel extremely body conscious and I knew it was having a negative impact on my perception of myself. When your mental health is at stake, there’s never a reason not to unfollow. However, it doesn’t have to be as serious as that. I might stop following somebody on Instagram simply because their images don’t inspire me the way they used to, and what’s wrong with that? As social media users, we’re all well within our rights to follow and unfollow whoever we please, and it doesn’t have to have anything to do with the person behind the account. Having said all this, I still find it difficult.
 
Well, I’m going to bite the bullet. I’m sure you’re sick of me teasing it in every post, but my content is undergoing a change at the moment, and I need to be as inspired and positive as possible on the other side. I’ve given way too much time to making myself miserable on social media over the last couple of years and it’s time to put a stop to that. A shorter but more productive time on social media makes for a happy human.
 
Also, if you want to follow me on Twitter, I mostly post dog videos, The Good Place GIFs and shameless self promotion. On second thought, my Instagram is probably better, to be honest.


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Martha Jane Edwards wearing a baker boy hat, borg trucker jacket, white high neck knit, black skinny jeans and buckled black ankle boots with a black tote bag | marthajaneedwards.com

Martha Jane Edwards wearing a baker boy hat, borg trucker jacket, white high neck knit, black skinny jeans and buckled black ankle boots with a black tote bag | marthajaneedwards.com
Martha Jane Edwards wearing a baker boy hat, borg trucker jacket, white high neck knit, black skinny jeans and buckled black ankle boots with a black tote bag | marthajaneedwards.com

OUTFIT DETAILS


BLACK BAKER BOY HATASOS (similar)
BORG TRUCKER JACKETMissguided (similar)
WHITE HIGH NECK KNIT JUMPERMissguided
BLACK SKINNY JEANSASOS
BLACK TOTE BAG WITH ROSE GOLD ACCENTSASOS

BLACK ANKLE BOOTS WITH GOLD BUCKLEKurt Geiger at ASOS

Martha Jane Edwards wearing a baker boy hat, borg trucker jacket, white high neck knit, black skinny jeans and buckled black ankle boots with a black tote bag | marthajaneedwards.com

Martha Jane Edwards wearing a baker boy hat, borg trucker jacket, white high neck knit, black skinny jeans and buckled black ankle boots with a black tote bag | marthajaneedwards.com

WHAT I’M WEARING


 
 
 
 
This borg trucker jacket might not be the most flattering item I’ve ever worn, but it’s certainly snuggly enough to see me through the cold winter ahead. Sure, the baker boy hat and buckled boots leave me looking a little like a train driver, but I kind of dig it!
 
 

 
 
 


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